Comfortable with the Uncomfortable

With three days of field under my belt, I have already rallied through a whirlwind of experiences.  For those of you just starting or continuing a field placement, I would like to share a few words from a very wise field instructor who spoke of this interesting concept of “being comfortable with the uncomfortable”.  I would consider myself a fairly comfortable in her own shoes kind of gal but field is a whole new ballpark of discomforts.  As I completed my first full week of field last week I was flooded with information, emotions and experiences tying into what I’m learning in class and experiencing in life.  I had a key realization that this calm, cool, collected and confident student was going to be put to the test and undoubtedly will be presented with a variety of uncomfortable situations that come in all shapes, sizes, colors and personalities.  While enduring these uncomfortable situations and practicing a bit of humility, my field instructor gave me another great tip;  when in doubt, play the student card.  We’re not expected to be the experts quite yet.  I commend all of us out there in the field for stepping out of our comfort zones.

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About Sarah Smith

Greetings! My name is Sarah Smith and I am in my second year of the Mountain Area Distance Education program through the UNC Chapel Hill School of Social Work. I have the pleasure of living in Asheville while participating in the program and take full advantage of the beautiful mountains and unique community. During my first year, I continued my work as the Outreach Coordinator of the YMCA of Western North Carolina working with low income children and their families within the Asheville community. For my second year, I am inspired to begin my field placement for CarePartners Hospice in Asheville. I hope to continue in Direct Practice with Families and Children. Although my love for Asheville is genuine, I was born and raised in Ohio! You can find me at sarahss@email.unc.edu, or your local coffee house. Cheers.
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